Large Mesquite Bowl Blanks

Note : Dimensions commonly provided below in Length x Width x Depth are for the purpose of estimating the maximum size if the finished turned piece possible out of each blank. In the case of bowl and platter blanks I frequently use templates to scribe a circle showing the maximum diameter of bowl possible from each blank.

The approximate weight (in pounds) were measured at the time that the blanks were photographed and sealed. Some drying will occur and the weights are likely to be less by the time that the blanks are delivered. The descriptions accompanying the photos are my attempt at describing all obvious physical flaws or character features, the good and the bad, such as pith cracks, checks, flame figure, etc.

Also, most of these blanks are rough cut - I do not have the time or equipment to joint all of the cut surfaces.

You can see examples of various bowls and vessels turned from Texas Honey Mesquite and other "exotic" Texas woods on my companion website, www.prairiesend.com.

Please be aware - as with most of the wood on this website (other than the pen blanks), these Mesquite blanks are fresh and green, or only partially air-dried. Unless otherwise noted, they have NOT been kiln-dried and any turning must consider greenwood turning procedures. That said - one of the beauties of Mesquite is its stability - being one of the most stable woods in the world with minimal to no warping and checking due to drying.





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Mesquite Lot M-922
9" x 10-1/2" x 4"
13-3/4 lbs.

This is a nice half-log Honey Mesquite bowl blank. The colors include the reddish-brown of Mesquite heartwood, the yellow of Mesquite sapwood and the dark brown of Mesquite bark. It has full bark on the backside and is well suited for a natural edge bowl, as well as for a conventional bowl. Were I turning this blank, my choice would be a natural-edge bowl form. This blank should yield a bowl of approximately 8-1/2 to 9" diameter and 3-1/2 to 4" depth.

I was unable to halve this log right through the pith. As a result, the pith lies approximately 1/4 to 1/2" below the annotated face. Several small and tight radial cracks are associated with the pith at one end (middle photo) and two longer (~2" each side of the pith) and larger radial cracks flank the pith on the opposite end (top photo). These could be turned-off during the initial lathe work, with a loss of ~1/2" of bowl depth, or simply reinforced and filled with CA glue or some attractive epoxy/color/mineral mix.

There are a number of open and frass-filled borer holes in the sapwood and, in one area (annotated face on the top photo), within the outer portion of the heartwood. Most will turn off as the bowl is roughed to round; any that remain can also be infilled with an attractive epoxy mix. I see no other significant flaws.



Sold
Mesquite Lot M-922 $50.00


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Mesquite Lot M-923
8" x 10" x 4"
13-1/4 lbs.

This is a near-perfect, half-log Honey Mesquite bowl blank. The colors include the reddish-brown of Mesquite heartwood, the yellow of Mesquite sapwood and the dark brown of Mesquite bark. It has nearly full bark on the backside and would work for a natural edge bowl, as well as for a conventional bowl. However, the barks seems a bit fragile and may not hold well as the bowl is being turned. This blank should yield a bowl of approximately 7-1/2 to 8" diameter and 3 to 3-1/2" depth.

The pith has been cut completely out of this blank and the only cracks that are visible are several thin cracks on the annotated face and a few short and very tight tail-ends of radial pith cracks on the end-grain faces. These are minor and I would simply reinforce them with thin CA glue. There are a number of open and frass-filled borer holes in the sapwood and within the outer portion of the heartwood. Most will turn off as the bowl is roughed to round; any deeper ones that remain can be infilled with an attractive epoxy/mineral mix. I see no other significant flaws.



Sold
Mesquite Lot M-923 $55.00


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Mesquite Lot M-926
10" x 11" x 4"
17 lbs.

This is a nice half-log bowl blank from a large crotch of a Texas Honey Mesquite. The colors include the reddish-brown of Mesquite heartwood, the golden yellow of our Mesquite sapwood and the dark brown of Mesquite bark. The grain pattern includes a prominent flame figure within the crotch in the upper portion of the blank (top photo). It has full bark on the backside and is well suited for a natural edge bowl, as well as for a conventional bowl. Were I turning this blank, my choice would be a natural-edge bowl form such that the crotch-flame figure would be exposed on the inside of the finished bowl. This blank should yield a bowl of approximate 9-1/2 to 10" diameter and 3" depth.

I attempted to halve this log right through the pith, but got "side-tracked" somehow! The pith was removed from the lower half of the log section, but remains at shallow depth within both limbs of the crotch. Several small and narrow radial cracks are associated with those two piths and can be seen on the annotated face and both end-grain faces of the crotch limbs (top and middle photos). In a NE bowl form, most of these cracks will turn off as the bowl form is turned, but some portions will remain. Those remaining will be short and relatively minor and I would simply reinforce/fill them with CA glue before/during turning.

There are a number of open and frass-filled borer holes in the sapwood and, in one area (middle and bottom photos), within the outer portion of the heartwood. Most will turn off as the bowl is roughed to round; any that remain can be infilled with something attractive (turquoise anyone?). I see no other significant flaws.



Sold
Mesquite Lot M-926 $50.00


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Mesquite Lot M-911
10" x 11" x 4"
17 lbs.

This is a nice large half-log bowl blank of burly Texas Honey Mesquite. It was cut from a tree that had numerous small to large, swollen and corrugated bulges in the bark - likely hiding burl buds and a complex grain pattern. This specific blank includes three of those bulges on the back side, one of which is exposed on one side of the annotated face of the blank (top photo, right side). More such features are likely present elsewhere in the outer portion of the blank below the other knobs.

The colors include the rich reddish-brown of Mesquite heartwood, the golden yellow of our Mesquite sapwood and the dark brown of Mesquite bark. With full bark on the backside, this blank is well suited for a natural edge bowl, as well as for a conventional bowl. Were I turning this blank, my choice would be a conventional bowl form such that the burly character associated with those back-side bulges would be exposed in the insides of the finished bowl. This blank should yield a burly bowl of approximate 10" diameter and 4" depth.

This blank does include some turning challenges. The pith of the log lies at or just below the annotated cut face and several small, tight and fairly shallow pith-related radial cracks are present. Two are present on the upper edge of the annotated face (top and bottom photos) and result in several dark-stained lines and one shallow area of "pop-out" on that edge. One very small and tight radial crack is present on the lower portion of the annotated face and adjacent end-grain face (top and 3rd photos). In addition, the top and third photos reveal a long and curving, but thin and tight radial crack (associated with a small, bedded limb) that, on the adjacent end-grain face, abruptly changes to a tight radial (cross-grain) crack. On top of all that, a single, tight and curving ring-type (intra-grain) crack is present on the opposite end-grain face of the blank (bottom photo). Most of these cracks will turn off as the bowl form is turned, but some portions will remain. All are relatively minor and I would simply reinforce them with thin CA glue before turning. You may also choose to turn-off the upper 1/4" to 1/2" of the blank to remove the pith and most of those tight cracks.

Other features of this blank includes the aformentioned imbedded small branch and associated imbedded bark around and extending down in the top photo. There is also another pocket of imbedded bark on one end-grain face (third photo). Reinforcing of the imbedded branch and those pockets of imbedded bark with thin CA glue is recommended, even though most will turn off as the bowl is shaped. In addition, there are several small and very tight drying checks on one end-rain face (bottom photo, but too thin to be seen). These too should turn off as the bowl is shaped. I see no other significant flaws.



Sold
Mesquite Lot M-911 $60.00


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Mesquite Lot M-912
11-1/2" x 12" x 5-6"
23-3/4 lbs.

This is another, very large half-log bowl blank of burly Texas Honey Mesquite. It was cut from a tree that had numerous small to large, swollen and corrugated bulges in the bark - likely hiding burl buds and a complex grain pattern. This specific blank includes five of those bulges on the back side, one of which is exposed on one side of the annotated face of the blank (top photo, right side), and a second, including a "streaming" ray pattern is visible on one end-grain face (photo 4). More such features are likely present elsewhere in the outer portion of the blank below the other knobs.

The colors include the rich reddish-brown of Mesquite heartwood, the golden yellow of our Mesquite sapwood and the dark brown of Mesquite bark. With full bark on the backside, this blank would be well suited for a natural edge bowl, as well as for a conventional bowl. However, were I turning this blank, it would be a conventional bowl form such that the burly character associated with those back-side, burly bulges would be exposed in the insides of the finished bowl. This blank should yield a burly bowl of approximate 11" diameter and 4" to 5" depth (depending on how you choose to handle the flaws described below).

This blank does include significant turning challenges, in the form of several radial cracks. The pith of the log lies at or just below the annotated face and one large and open pith-related radial crack, as well as three smaller, radial-type cracks are present (photos 1, 3 and 4). The larger crack extends across most of the annotated face and is as deep as 1-1/4" on one end (photo 3), but seems to taper out on the opposite side of the blank (photo 4 and top of photo 1). However, a second and shorter radial crack lies to the right of, and sub-parallel to, the larger crack and extends to the end of the blank (photo 1). The depth of that crack is almost 2" (photo 4). Two small and thin cracks are also present to the right of the pith, but these are minor and should be removed as the bowl is hollowed-out. The choices appear to be turning of the upper 2" or so to remove the radial cracks, or reinforcing the cracks with CA glue and filling the open portions with an attractive medium (turquoise anyone?). I would go for the latter.

In addition, a pocket of imbedded bark is present on the annotated face (photo 1) and more are possible at depth. That visible pocket will likely intersect the rim of the bowl so I recommend reinforcing it with thin CA glue. Also, one large borer hole is present on one end-grain face (upper left portion, photo 4). This is classic Mesquite - more holes may be encountered as the bowl is turned, providing opportunities for your creating artistry! I see no other significant flaws.



Sold
Mesquite Lot M-912 $80.00


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Mesquite Lot M-837
~9" diameter x ~4" depth
8-1/4 lbs.

This is a very nice round-trimmed, slab-type bowl blank of burly Texas Honey Mesquite. It was cut specifically from the log to include one fairly large, bark-side bulge and two smaller bulges that likely contain burly grain, bud and ray patterns. Clusters of burl buds and burly rays are exposed below those areas on the annotated face and side (photos 1 and 2).

The colors include the rich reddish-brown of Mesquite heartwood, the bright golden yellow of our Mesquite sapwood and the dark brown-black of Mesquite bark. With full bark on the backside, this blanks would be suitable for a natural edge bowl, but I would go for a conventional bowl form to best expose the burly character in the bottom as well as on the sides. Note, that patch of bark on the very edge of the blank (Photo 4) suggests that the maximum bowl diameter of a conventional bowl form will be less than the 9" diameter of the blank. Also, due to a low area within the bark side, the maximum bepth of a conventional bowl form looks like it will be about 2 to 2-1/2 inches.

The pith of the log lies well outside this blank and I see no serious cracks or checks. However, there are several small, "flakey" cracks in and around some of the burly elements exposed on the annotated face. I suspect those to be "stress-release" cracks related to recent milling. I would use CA glue to reinforce them, and any others that may be found or occur, before and during turning. I see no significant flaws.



Sold
Mesquite Lot M-837 $60.00


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Mesquite Lot M-838
~9" diameter x ~5" depth
10-1/4 lbs.

This is another very nice round-trimmed, slab-type bowl blank of burly Texas Honey Mesquite. It was cut specifically from the log to include two fairly large, bark-side bulges that likely contain burly grain, bud and ray patterns. In fact, clusters of burl buds and burly rays are prominently exposed below those areas on the annotated face and adjacent side (photos 1 and 2).

The colors include the rich reddish-brown of Mesquite heartwood, the bright golden yellow of our Mesquite sapwood and the dark brown-black of Mesquite bark. With full bark on the backside, this blanks would be suitable for a natural edge bowl, but I would go for a conventional bowl form to best expose the burly character in the bottom as well as on the sides. Note, due to a low area between the "bulges" on the barky back side (photo 4), the maximum depth of a conventional bowl form looks like it will be about 3 inches.

The pith of the log lies well outside this blank and I see no serious cracks or checks. There are several holes on one side of the blank (photo 2), one of which appears to be a "gappy" area of now-decayed, white-colored included bark. The other cluster of three smaller holes may be old borer holes. I see no other significant flaws.



Sold
Mesquite Lot M-838 $65.00


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Mesquite Lot M-839
~8-1/2" diameter x ~4" depth
7-1/4 lbs.

This is another, very nice round-trimmed, slab-type bowl blank of burly Texas Honey Mesquite. It was cut specifically from the log to include a fairly large, bark-side bulge that likely contains burly grain, bud and ray patterns. Clusters of burl buds and burly rays are exposed below those areas on the annotated face and sides (photos 1 and 2).

The colors include the rich reddish-brown of Mesquite heartwood, the bright golden yellow of our Mesquite sapwood and the dark brown-black of Mesquite bark. With full bark on the backside, this blanks would be suitable for a natural edge bowl, but I would go for a conventional bowl form (or possibly an oval hollow-form) to best expose the burly character in the bottom as well as on the sides. Note, that there are two areas of bark that will complicate turning a bowl from this blank. A partially-included section of bark on one edge may reduce the maximum diameter of a conventional bowl form (unless a "rolled" upper lip is planned). In addition, there is a tight line of included bark that extends well into the inner portion of the bowl form (Photos 1, 2 and 3). That is likely the result of two adjacent limbs that merged as the tree grew, trapping that narrow line of bark. I would apply a lot of thin CA glue to those barky areas to stabilize them, and then make them a dramatic part of the finished bowl (or hollow-form). I see no other significant flaws.





Sold
Mesquite Lot M-839 $60.00


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Mesquite Lot M-828
10-1/2" x 11" x 4"
11-3/4 lbs.

This is another, very nice large half-log bowl blank of burly Texas Honey Mesquite. It is the other half of the log section that yielded M-827 above, harvested specifically because of a large, swollen and corrugated bulge in the side of the tree - likely hiding a complex burl. While the anticipated, strong burly figure was not exposed in the initial center-log cut, burly figure is present within and below "knobs" at the perimeter of that face cut and more are likely elsewhere in the outer portion of the blank below the other knobs and ridges.

The colors include the rich reddish-brown of Mesquite heartwood, the bright golden yellow of our Mesquite sapwood and the dark brown of Mesquite bark. With full bark and a complexly "corrugated" pattern of ridges on the backside, this blank is well suited for a natural edge bowl, as well as for a conventional bowl. Were I turning this blank, my choice would be a conventional bowl form such that the burly character (likely) associated with those back-side ridges would be exposed in the inside bottom of the finished bowl.

The pith has been removed completely from this blank but a single thin but open, shallow pith-related radial crack is present and extends completely across the annotated face. Most of that radial crack will turn off as a conventional bowl form is turned but two portions will remain below the rim on opposite sides. With those remaining portions being quite thin and shallow (<1" deep), I would simply reinforce them with thin CA glue before turning.

I see no other significant flaws.



Sold
Mesquite Lot M-828 $65.00


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Mesquite Bowl/Platter Blank M-820
~12" diameter x 1-4" depth
19 lbs.

This is a beautiful slab-type, burly Texas Honey Mesquite blank suitable for a shallow bowl or large platter. The colors are the deep reddish brown of mesquite heartwood with bright yellow sapwood and dark brown bark. The bark on the backside is full and tight so a barky, natural-edge bowl/platter is a possibility. That said, I would recommend reinforcing the bark with thin CA glue before and during turning to make sure it stays in place.

This slab blank was cut from the outer portion of a burly log and contains numerous clusters of burl buds within a beautifully complex grain pattern. Based on the lumpy/ridged bark surface on the back side, these burl buds likely extend thru the full depth to be present (and bigger?) in the outer sapwood layer. If I were turning this, I would go for a shallow conventional bowl form to preserve that beautiful character in the bottom of the bowl.

There is a single short and tight crack in the lower right-hand face of the blank. It is an old radial growth crack and should be quite stable now. I would just reinforce it with thin CA glue before turning. Those small dark brown spots scattered across the face of the blank appear to be old, imbedded bark pockets. They are quite sound, but again, I recommend reinforcing with thin CA glue before and during turning to be sure they stay that way. There are also several open and frass-filled bugholes visible in the sapwood and heartwood on the end-grain faces, and more are likely present beneath the bark-covered back. These will likely require attention during turning. I see no other significant flaws.



Sold
Mesquite Blank M-820 $60.00


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Mesquite Bowl/Platter Blank M-821
~12" diameter x 1-2" depth
13-1/2 lbs.

This is another beautiful slab-type, burly Texas Honey Mesquite blank. It is much thinner than M-820 above, and is probably most suitable for a large platter. The colors are the deep reddish brown of mesquite heartwood with bright yellow sapwood and dark brown bark. The bark on the backside is full and tight so some type of a barky, natural-edge platter is a possibility. In any case, I would recommend reinforcing the bark with thin CA glue before and during turning to make sure it stays in place until you want it gone!

The blank was cut from the outer portion of a burly log, right over a large crotch. Because it was cut shallow, there is no sign of a crotch-type flame of feather figure, but it does contain clusters of burl buds within a beautifully complex grain pattern. If I were turning this, and since it is really a very thin slab, I would mount it to turn as a natural-edge bowl so as to preserve that nice burly top face as the bottom of the platter. Not sure about the barky NE finish - I would make that decision after roughing it out to see how much stock is left and how the bark-edge/rim would look.

I see no cracks, checks or other structural flaws. There are several open and frass-filled bugholes visible in the sapwood and heartwood on the end-grain faces, and more are likely present beneath the bark-covered back. These will likely require attention during turning. I see no other significant flaws.



Sold
Mesquite Blank M-821 $50.00


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Mesquite Bowl/Platter Blank M-822
~10" diameter x 1-2" depth
8 lbs.

This is another beautiful slab-type, burly Texas Honey Mesquite blank. It is also not very thick so it is probably most suitable for a medium-size platter. The colors are the deep reddish brown of mesquite heartwood with bright yellow sapwood and dark brown bark. The bark on the backside is full and tight so some type of a barky, natural-edge platter is a possibility. In any case, I would recommend reinforcing the bark with thin CA glue before and during turning to make sure it stays in place until you want it gone!

The blank was cut from the outer portion of a burly log and contain several clusters of burl buds within a fairly complex grain pattern. If I were turning this, and since it is really a very thin slab, I would mount it to turn as a natural-edge bowl so as to preserve that nice burly top face as the bottom of the platter. Not sure about the barky NE finish - I would make that decision after roughing it out to see how much stock is left and how the bark-edge/rim would look.

I see no cracks, checks or other structural flaws. There are likely to be occasional open and/or frass-filled borer holes present beneath the bark-covered back. These will likely require attention during turning. Note, that vertical black line on the end-grain face of the middle photo is not a crack - it is a thin (and sound) bark inclusion.



Sold
Mesquite Blank M-822 $40.00


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Mesquite Bowl/Platter Blank M-823
~10" diameter x 1-2" depth
6-1/4 lbs.

This is a very nice slab-type, lightly-burly Honey Mesquite bowl blank. It is probably most suitable for a medium-size, shallow-depth bowl. The colors are the deep reddish brown of mesquite heartwood with bright yellow sapwood and dark brown bark. The bark on the backside is pretty much full and tight (just missing some of the outermost portions) so some type of a barky, natural-edge platter is a possibility. In any case, I would recommend reinforcing the bark with thin CA glue before and during turning to make sure it stays in place until you want it gone!

The blank was cut from the outer portion of a burly log and does contain two small clusters of burl buds on the annotated face. In addition, that irregularly-ridged backside suggests additional burly features deeper within the blank. If I were turning this, it would be mounted to turn as a fairly shallow conventional bowl, anticipating that the nicest burly features will lie at depth, closer to the outer portion of the log. Note please that it is not a uniformly thick blank, so if you turn a natural-edge bowl from it will have a sloping, "artsy" natural-edge rim, not a symmetrical (horizontal) rim - attractive in its own way but not really a functional bowl.

A single, very thin (tight) ring crack is present on the outer portion of one end-grain face (bottom photo, ~1" below the bark). I recommend reinforcing that minor flaw with thin CA glue before turning. There are several partially-open and frass-filled borer holes present in the sapwood (and one in the heartwood) of the end-grain faces, and there are likely to be more present beneath the bark-covered back. These will likely require attention during turning. I see no other cracks, checks or significant flaws.



Sold
Mesquite Blank M-823 $40.00


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Mesquite Lot M-810
13" diameter x 6-1/2 to 7-1/2" depth
33 lbs.

This is a nice very large and deep, half-log bowl blank in Texas Honey Mesquite. The colors include the rich reddish-brown of Mesquite heartwood, the golden to grayish yellow of Mesquite sapwood and the dark brown of Mesquite bark. This blank was cut from the tree in a section where a several side limbs were present so there is a good chance for crotch-related flame or feather figures at depth. In the course of cleaning-up the log, those side limbs and portions of the bark were removed, so this blank would not be suitable for a "barky" natural-edge bowl. It would be suitable for a deep conventional bowl as well as a large hollow-form, with a potential diameter of 11" to 13" and a depth of 6-1/2" to 7-1/2". Note, this blank was chainsaw cut from the log some time ago and the end-grain faces has darkened considerably. Fresh looking, reddish-brown heartwood colors lie just below that dark surface (see the end-grain face of the middle photo - I sanded a patch of the darker color off to reveal the true color).

The pith remains in this half of the log and several classic Mesquite pit-related growth cracks are present. The main one is a large radial crack that radiates out from the pith and is oriented roughly sub-parallel to the annotated face at a depth of 1/4 to 1". Was I turning this blank, it would be mounted on the lathe and the upper 1" would be turned-off to remove the pith and that major radial crack. That would leave the blank with a potential bowl depth of 6 to 6-1/2". The remaining cracks that I see on the exposed end-grain faces are minor and I would simply reinforce them with thin/medium CA glue.

There are several other of Mesquite's common character features visible in this blank. 1) Two large irregular shaped, gappy bark inclusions are present on one end-grain face (bottom photo). These probably represent the old bark-lined crotch areas between those old side branches and the main trunk, and became imbedded as the tree grew. Located where they are, those features are likely to turn off as the blank is rounded to shape a conventional bowl or hollow form. 2) There are also a number of small beetle holes in the sapwood and likely the outer heartwood areas. Most of these will turn off as the blank is roughed to round and the bark and outer sapwood portions are removed, but some may remain and will have to be addressed as the turning nears completion.



Sold
Mesquite Lot M-810 $55.00


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Mesquite Blank M-657
~10" diameter x 5" depth
11-1/2 lbs.

This is an interesting and challenging half-log, bowl blank from a large crotch section of Texas Honey Mesquite. The color is the strong reddish brown of mesquite heartwood, surrounded by a thin band of yellow to grayish-yellow sapwood, with full dark brown bark on the backside. The annotated face is dominated by a large, open, bark-lined crotch gap that extends from edge to edge across the blank.

In a perfect world, this crotch blank would be suitable for a bowl up to 10" in diameter and 4 to 5" deep, with a nice crotch grain pattern (feather or flame figure) in the center. But I do not know if a crotch grain is present because of the large bark-lined crotch gap. The presence of that gap would dictate turning of a conventional bowl form rather than a natural-edge form, and hollowing-out the interior of the bowl is likely to reveal a complex, crotch-related grain pattern. Where the barky gap is exposed on opposite sides of the blank, it ranges in depth from ~1/2" (top photo) to ~1" (bottom photo). However, probing with a thin slip of stiff paper indicates that the gap is as deep as 2" in the central portion. Clearly, portions of the barky crotch gap would remain at and somewhere below the rim on opposite sides of the finished bowl. Reinforcing of that bark and possibly filling of portions of the gap will likely be required - as I said, a challenge, but possibly with great reward!

I tried to cut the log in half directly thru the three piths of this crotch to produce this blank, but those piths did not cooperate. So the pith of the main section as well as the piths of the two branching limbs are present, extending from the surface of the annotated face on one side (near side, top photo) to a depth of ~1/2" on the opposite side(s) (bottom photo). There are several small radial cracks associated with those piths that extend to a maximum visible depth of 1/2" below the annotated face (as exposed at the end-grain faces). The larger radial crack is associated with one limb of the crotch (right side limb, top and bottom photos) and that complex lies at a low angle to the annotated surface at a depth of less than 1/2". I would simply cut down the top of the blank by about 1/2" to remove the piths entirely along with most, if not all, of those radial cracks.

And again, as this is from an older Mesquite log, there are a number of both open and frass-filled borer holes in the sapwood and outer portion of the heartwood. It looks as if all of those borer holes will turn off in a conventional bowl form. I see no other cracks, checks or significant flaws.



Sold
Mesquite Blank M-657 $45.00


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Mesquite Blank M-622
~12" diameter x 6-7" depth
19-1/4 lbs.

This is another very nice, round, half-log, bowl blank of Texas Honey Mesquite. It appears to be suitable for a bowl up to 11" in diameter and 4 to 4-1/2" deep. The color is the deep reddish brown of mesquite heartwood, surrounded by a thin band of yellow sapwood, with full dark brown bark on the backside. It has been roughly trimmed to round and would be suitable for a conventional bowl or for a "barky" natural-edge bowl. However, if you want a full bark edge on the "natural" rim, you will need to secure the bark with CA glue while turning. This blank comes from an older log and the bark is not as tight as that from a fresh log.

I cut the log in half directly thru the pith to produce this blank, so the actual pith is not present. However, radial cracks associated with the pith are present at that cut face and exposed at both end-grain faces (small and insignificant (?) at one end and larger and ~2" deep at the opposite end). Regardless of your planned bowl form, you will have to contend with these classic Mesquite features at some point! If a conventional bowl is planned and you do not want to trim that face, you will have to work with one fairly large (~1/4" wide) crack at the rim. However, these radial cracks in Mesquite are not dynamic drying features, but are formed by stresses on the tree during growth. They are generally quite stable after the blank is cut from the log. Were I turning this, my objective would be a natural-edge bowl, reinforcing and, if necessary filling, any pith-related cracks that may remain.

I see no other cracks, checks or significant flaws.



Sold
Mesquite Blank M-622 $50.00


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Mesquite Lot M-485
13" diameter and 6-7" depth
30 lbs.

This blank was inadvertently marked as "SOLD" sometime in the past and I did not catch that error until recently. When I cut it (at least a year or so ago), it was essentially a "perfect" large and deep, trimmed half-log bowl blank in Texas Honey Mesquite. I say perfect because it was cut well away from the pith of a large log such that there are absolutely none of the pith-related ring and radial cracks typically found in Mesquite. There also were no drying checks or other significant flaws that I could see (note - those small black lines on the side of the blank are just felt-tip marker lines, saw-cut line and saw blade burnish marks related to my trimming - not cracks or checks). The only limitation to this blank was that it would not be suitable for a "barky" natural edge bowl due to the absence of a portion of the bark. But it was ideal for a 12" to 13" diameter X 6" to 7" depth conventional bowl.

However, it is no longer a "perfect" bowl blank - just a pretty good one! Going for a long hot, Texas summer in my barn wood-room, it did dry to the point where several drying checks opened-up on one end-grain face. The bottom photo is recent (3/1/2013) and shows all of those new checks. All are quite thin to tight and all but one appear to be shallow. The longest one, clearly visible in that new photo, is long - extending from the annotated face to the back side (in two overlapping portions) but exhibits a depth of less than 1/2" where it intersects the annotated face. The only one clearly cutting significantly deep into the annotated face is just to the left of that long check. That check extends ~3" into the annotated face and ~1-1/2" down the end-grain side. Were I turning this blank, I would reinforce all of those checks with thin CA glue and then fill any open gaps with something attractive such as black epoxy. I would not expect any further problems with those checks.

Otherwise, my original description still stands - the primary color is the rich reddish-brown of Mesquite heartwood. The yellow sapwood is present but it is somewhat grayish-tinged due to the age of the log. The sapwood also does include the occasional beetle hole, so if I were turning this blank, both the incomplete bark and the sapwood would be turned off when roughing-out of the overall form. I have trimmed this half-log blank to rough-round to reduce the shipping weight and to better reveal the internal quality.

This is still a very nice bowl blank, but the price below reflects the presence of the end-grain described above.



Sold
Mesquite Lot M-485 $75.00


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Mesquite Blank M-450
10" diameter x 5" depth
21-1/4 lbs.

This is a large, fresh, near-perfect half-log bowl blank in Texas Honey Mesquite. The colors include the rich reddish-brown of Mesquite heartwood, the bright golden yellow of the sapwood and the dark brown of bark. With full bark on the backside it would be suitable for a natural edge bowl as well as a conventional bowl.

The log was halved almost precisely along the pith, and portions of that pith lie at or very close to the top face. Several prominent pith-related radial cracks are present at that cut face. Where these cracks intersect the end-grain faces of the blank they are tight and appear to extend into the blank less than 1". If this block was turned as a natural-edge bowl most if not all of these cracks will turn off.

I see no other cracks or significant flaws.



Sold
Mesquite Blank M-450 $60.00


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Mesquite Lot M-414
9" x 10" x 5-1/2"
17-3/4 lbs.

This is a very nice large and deep, half-log bowl blank in Texas Honey Mesquite. The colors include the rich reddish-brown of Mesquite heartwood, the bright golden yellow of our Mesquite sapwood and the dark brown of Mesquite bark. With full bark on the backside it would be suitable for a natural edge bowl as well as a conventional bowl (or even a hollow-form), close to a diameter of 9" and a depth of 4-1/2 to 5".

The pith is present in this blank at a depth of ~1/8" (end-grain face, top photo) to ~3/8" (end-grain face, bottom photo). A narrow zone of pith-related cracks cross the annotated face and appear to be quite significant (top photo), but they are certainly not very significant where they intersect the end-grain faces. Two very thin and tight cracks are present to a depth of less than 3/4" on the end grain face shown on the top photo, but are too thin to be visible on that photo. And, two thin and tight cracks (and maybe a 3rd tiny one) radiate out from the pith to a maximum depth of 1-1/8" on the end-grain face at the opposite end. These are faintly visible on the bottom photo. Were I turning this as a conventional bowl, I would mount it on the lathe and trim off the pith portion (say 1/2") when roughing it to round, and then reinforce and if necessary fill any remaining cracks with CA glue. If this block was turned as a natural-edge bowl most if not all of these cracks will turn off and the only crack reinforcement might be for the tenon. I see no other cracks or significant flaws.

Note - there are several small but prominent, beetle holes in the bark, sapwood and outer heartwood and are visible on the end-grain faces. Most of these will turn off as the blank is roughed to round but more are likely present under the full-bark backside and will have to be addressed as the turning nears completion.



SOLD
Mesquite Lot M-414 $55.00


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Mesquite Blank M-367
15" (14-1/2" inside the bark) x 15" x 6 to 7"
49 lbs.

This is another nice, but somewhat challenging, very large half-log bowl blank in Texas Honey Mesquite. It also has full bark on the back and can be turned for either a conventional bowl or a "barky" natural-edge bowl. The color is the deep reddish brown of mesquite heartwood and bright yellow sapwood, with a strong and linear grain pattern.

I did cut the pith out of this blank, but the tail ends of several radial cracks related to that absent pith are present at the cut face (top and middle photos). However, those cracks are not visible at either end-grain face and I suspect that these remaining portions visible in the center of the face are shallow, and will likely not reduce the potential depth of the bowl by more than 1/2". Note - that curving line on the left side of the end-grain face on the middle photo is a chainsaw mark - not a crack.

At first glance, this large blank should be suitable for a bowl of up to 14" diameter and 6" to 7" depth. The challenge is that there was a small, assymetrical crotch (a side limb) in the log from which this blank was cut, and the remains of a large old imbedded limb and a good-sized, bark-filled crotch gap/bark inclusion are exposed in one end-grain face (middle photo, the imbedded limb is on the left). The imbedded limb is partially decayed with several open holes and my probing indicates that one hole extends at least 3-1/2" into the blank. Complete removal of that imbedded branch would likely reduce the length of this blank to 11" or less and the maximum bowl diameter to less than 11". The positive side of this "flaw" is that Mesquite crotches frequently exhibit a very nice flame/feather crotch figure. If I were turning this, the bark inclusion and imbedded limb would be reinforced and stabilized with thin epoxy or CA glue before mounting on the lathe and then once the bowl was roughed-out, any remaining gaps would be filled with something nice ("liquid gold" epoxy, inlace, turquoise, etc). I would hope for a nice crotch figure to show up on the side of the finished bowl!

This blank also includes a very fine network of thin drying checks on one end-grain face and to a lesser amount on the opposite face (somebody left this fresh-cut log section out in direct sunlight for several days!) Again, these checks so small that they are not apparent in the photos, and as is typical of Mesquite (due its unique stability), they are tight and very shallow. They will not pose a structural problem and should turn off easily with minimal loss of potential bowl diameter. I see no other significant flaws.



Sold
Mesquite Blank M-367 65.00


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Mesquite Blank M-368
15" (14-1/2" inside the bark) x 15" x 7 to 8-1/2"
48 lbs.

This is a nice, but challenging, very large half-log bowl blank in Texas Honey Mesquite. This large blank should be suitable for a bowl of up to 14" diameter and 6-1/2" to 7-1/2" depth. It also has full bark on the back and could be turned for either a conventional bowl or a "barky" natural-edge bowl. The color is the deep reddish brown of mesquite heartwood and bright yellow sapwood, with a strong and linear grain pattern.

The pith is present within this blank, extending from the cut face on one end (middle photo) to a depth of ~1-1/4" below the face on the opposite end (bottom photo). There are several pith-related radial cracks that appear to mainly lie between that 0 to 1-1/4" pith depth and the main face. If a completely pith-free (and hopefully a crack-free) bowl is required, that upper 1-1/4" may have to be cut off, or turned-off, leaving a maximum final bowl depth of 7" or less. I turn a lot of bowls from similar Mesquite blanks and typically reinforce such cracks with CA glue and, when necessary, fill any remaining open cracks with colored epoxy or some type of inlace.

This blank also includes a very fine network of thin drying checks on one end-grain face and to a lesser amount on the opposite face (again, someone left this fresh-cut log section out in direct sunlight for several days!) These checks so small that they are not apparent in the photos, and as is typical of Mesquite (due its unique stability), they are tight and very shallow. They should not pose a structural problem and should turn off easily with minimal loss of potential bowl diameter. I see no other significant flaws.



Sold
Mesquite Blank M-368 75.00




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This bowl was recently turned from Texas Honey Mesquite. Additional examples of Mesquite turnings are presented on our companion website Prairie's End Woodshop.






Listing last updated 3 June 2016


Nothing here that suits your needs?
Then send me an email at: l.stahl@maroon.com
or a telephone call at:
281-392-5336 (home/shop w/ans. machine)
281-782-0185 (cell, but w/o voice mail or texting)

There is a possibility that I have more, either cut into blocks or in the rough log,
so I may be able to meet your specific requirements.
If not - send an email with your requirements and I will put it into my
"wood requested by species"
files and see if I can cut it next time I have a log of that species up on the mill.




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